FDA adds four tropical diseases to priority review voucher program to encourage drug development in areas of unmet need

Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced the addition of Lassa fever, chikungunya virus disease, rabies and cryptococcal meningitis to the list of tropical diseases. Applicants who submit applications for drug or biological products to prevent or treat these diseases may qualify for a tropical disease priority review voucher (PRV). A tropical disease PRV can be used to obtain priority review of a subsequent drug application that does not itself qualify for priority review.

August 23, 2018

Media Inquiries

  Theresa Eisenman
  301-796-2969

“Part of our work to protect and promote public health of Americans includes monitoring global diseases and pathogens and ensuring we have a robust pipeline of drugs and biologics to treat or prevent the spread of these infectious diseases. Today we’ve added four diseases to a program designed to encourage development of new drug and biological products to prevent or treat certain tropical diseases affecting millions of people throughout the world, including Lassa fever, which impacted more than 400 people during an outbreak in Nigeria earlier this year, killing over 100 people. Tropical diseases cause a significant health burden globally. Yet, there has been remarkably little progress over the past 50 years in drug and biologic development to treat and prevent these diseases,” said FDA’s Chief Scientist RADM Denise Hinton. “Although tropical diseases generally are uncommon in the United States, tourism, immigration and military operations are increasing the direct effect these diseases can have on the health of Americans. But because these diseases are found primarily in low- and lower-middle income countries, existing incentives have been insufficient to encourage the development of new and innovative drug and biological products. With the tropical disease priority review voucher program, Congress intended to stimulate development of drugs and biologics to prevent and treat infectious diseases for which there are no significant markets in developed nations and that disproportionately affect poor and marginalized populations.”

Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced the addition of Lassa fever, chikungunya virus disease, rabies and cryptococcal meningitis to the list of tropical diseases. Applicants who submit applications for drug or biological products to prevent or treat these diseases may qualify for a tropical disease priority review voucher (PRV). A tropical disease PRV can be used to obtain priority review of a subsequent drug application that does not itself qualify for priority review.

To be eligible for a tropical disease PRV, a drug application must meet the criteria in section 524 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. The criteria include that the application must be for the prevention or treatment of a “tropical disease.” Beyond the list of “tropical diseases” in the statute, the FDA can issue an order to designate additional diseases as “tropical diseases” if the agency determines that a disease has no significant market in developed nations and disproportionately affects poor and marginalized populations. Interested parties can submit additional disease candidates for designation to a public docket (FDA-2008-N-0567-0011) for the FDA’s consideration.

Products developed to treat or prevent Lassa fever, chikungunya virus disease, rabies and cryptococcal meningitis that meet the other criteria for eligibility can now qualify for tropical disease PRVs, hopefully helping to encourage development of safe and effective products for these harmful diseases.

Advertisements

USFDA has released GUIDANCE for Quality Attributes of *CHEWABLE TABLETS

Image result for Quality Attributes of *CHEWABLE TABLETS

 

*CQAs of CHEWABLE TABLETS (CT)*
USFDA has released GUIDANCE for Quality Attributes of *CHEWABLE TABLETS*
According to this latest guideline, FDA has recommended sponsor/applicant should also incorporate following CQAs:
*1. PATIENT ACCEPTABILITY*
Acceptable Taste, Mouthfeel & Aftertaste With-
*2. HARDNESS / BREAKING FORCE / CRUSHING STRENGTH*
Hardness of CTshould be kept  low  (i.e.  <12 kp).
A higher hardness  value  (e.g.,  >12 kp)  may  be  considered if  justified.  An example  of  such justification could be  demonstrating  significant disintegration and/or  reduction in hardness  of  such  tablets  following  brief  i.e.  30 seconds  in-vitro exposure to simulated saliva (1 mL) before chewing to ensure patient compliance without  GI  obstruction (choking in throat / blocking bowel movement) in the case if patient swallow tablet without chewing due to high hardness
*3. CHEWING DIFFICULTY INDEX*
CDI is a value derived from the relationship between two methods used for measuring tablet strength: diametral compression (diametrical tensile strength) and flexural bending (flexure tensile strength test), to ensure patient compliance without damage to teeth or dentures
CDI should be also evaluated before & after in-vitro exposure to 1 mL of simulated saliva for 30 seconds
*4. DISINTEGRATION & DISSOLUTION*
CT should  typically  meet the  same  disintegration  and dissolution specifications  as _IR  tablets_. In vitro DT & Dissolution testing  should be  conducted on  _intact_ chewable  tablets since  _it is  possible  that some  patients  might swallow  the  tablets  without chewing_.
*5. Others*
If functional coated particles are present in chewable tablet then applicant has to ensure its functionality even after chewing tablets.
////////////USFDA, GUIDANCE, Quality Attributes, CHEWABLE TABLETS

FDA approves new treatment Galafold (migalastat) for a rare genetic disorder, Fabry disease

New Drug Approvals

FDA approves new treatment for a rare genetic disorder, Fabry disease

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Galafold (migalastat), the first oral medication for the treatment of adults with Fabry disease. The drug is indicated for adults with Fabry disease who have a genetic mutation determined to be responsive (“amenable”) to treatment with Galafold based on laboratory data. Fabry disease is a rare and serious genetic disease that results from buildup of a type of fat called globotriaosylceramide (GL-3) in blood vessels, the kidneys, the heart, the nerves and other organs.

August 10, 2018

Release

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Galafold (migalastat), the first oral medication for the treatment of adults with Fabry disease. The drug is indicated for adults with Fabry disease who have a genetic mutation determined to be responsive (“amenable”) to treatment with Galafold based on laboratory data. Fabry…

View original post 441 more words

FDA approves first-of-its kind targeted RNA-based therapy Onpattro (patisiran) to treat a rare disease

New Drug Approvals

Image result for patisiranFDA approves first-of-its kind targeted RNA-based therapy to treat a rare disease

First treatment for the polyneuropathy of hereditary transthyretin-mediated amyloidosis in adult patients

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Onpattro (patisiran) infusion for the treatment of peripheral nerve disease (polyneuropathy) caused by hereditary transthyretin-mediated amyloidosis (hATTR) in adult patients. This is the first FDA-approved treatment for patients with polyneuropathy caused by hATTR, a rare, debilitating and often fatal genetic disease characterized by the buildup of abnormal amyloid protein in peripheral nerves, the heart and other organs. It is also the first FDA approval of a new class of drugs called small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) treatment

Continue reading…

https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/UCM616518.htm?utm_campaign=08102018_PR_FDA%20approves%20new%20drug%20for%20rare%20disease%2C%20hATTR&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Eloqua

August 10, 2018

Release

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Onpattro (patisiran) infusion for the treatment of peripheral nerve disease (polyneuropathy) caused by hereditary transthyretin-mediated amyloidosis (hATTR) in adult patients. This is the first FDA-approved treatment…

View original post 760 more words

FDA approves new vaginal ring for one year of birth control

New Drug Approvals

FDA approves new vaginal ring for one year of birth control

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Annovera (segesterone acetate and ethinyl estradiol vaginal system), which is a combined hormonal contraceptive for women of reproductive age used to prevent pregnancy and is the first vaginal ring contraceptive that can be used for an entire year. Annovera is a reusable donut-shaped (ring), non-biodegradable, flexible vaginal system that is placed in the vagina for three weeks followed by one week out of the vagina, at which time women may experience a period (a withdrawal bleed). This schedule is repeated every four weeks for one year (thirteen 28-day menstrual cycles).

August 10, 2018

Release

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Annovera (segesterone acetate and ethinyl estradiol vaginal system), which is a combined hormonal contraceptive for women of reproductive age used to prevent pregnancy and is the…

View original post 378 more words